Nathan A. Finn

Historian, Theologian, Teacher, Preacher

Monthly Archive: August 2012

Monday

27

August 2012

0

COMMENTS

Thursday

23

August 2012

1

COMMENTS

Theologians In and For the Church

Written by , Posted in Books, Ministry, Theology

For our annual faculty workshop at Southeastern Seminary, we read Brad Green’s stimulating book The Gospel and the Mind: Recovering and Shaping the Intellectual Life (Crossway, 2010). I first read Green’s book when it was first published (see my review), but I was happy to revisit it for our faculty discussions. Among the many helpful passages, this one stood out:

[W]e should not overlook the obvious: God has chosen to change lives and work in his people through the local church and the ministry of pastors. To put it plainly: to truly have a Christian mind, to truly be a Christian intellectual, it to have a mind transformed by Christ. And to have a mind transformed by Christ—a mind moved to repentance, led to knowledge of the truth, and able to escape the snare of the devil—is to have placed oneself within a key channel of grace, a church where biblical pastoral ministry is practiced (p. 160).

As one who longs to see a growing number of pastor-theologians and theologians who are pastors among Southern Baptists and other evangelicals, I offer a hearty “amen” to Green’s thoughts. Christian scholars, especially theologians, use their intellectual gifts to serve the church. And you cannot serve the church faithfully without submitting to the oversight of a local congregation and her pastor(s).

Thursday

9

August 2012

0

COMMENTS

New Edition of Southeastern Theological Review Now Available

Written by , Posted in Books, History, Theology

The latest issue of the Southeastern Theological Review is now available. STR is a refereed scholarly journal published by the faculty of Southeastern Seminary. The editor is my friend Heath Thomas, who teaches Old Testament and serves as director of the PhD program at SEBTS. This issue is dedicated to engaging Michael Licona’s The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach (IVP Academic, 2010). Many readers may be familiar with Licona’s work, which has been heralded by numerous apologists and scholars, but has also generated considerable controversy among other scholars who are concerned that Licona’s views undermine the doctrine of inerrancy.

What follows is the table of contents for the Summer 2012 issue of STR:

“The Resurrection of Jesus: A Methodological Survey and Introduction to the Present Volume,” by Robert B. Stewart and Heath A. Thomas

“The Minimal Facts Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: The Role of Methodology as a Crucial Component in Establishing Historicity,” by Gary R. Habermas

“Inference, Method, and History,” by Timothy J. McGrew

“The Resurrection of Jesus: Explanation or Interpretation?” by C. Behan McCullagh

“In Reply to Habermas, McGrew, and McCullagh,” by Michael R. Licona

“A Roundtable Discussion with Michael Licona on The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach,” with Danny Akin, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Michael Kruger, Michael Licona, and Charles Quarles

In addition to these stimulating articles, STR also includes dozens of critical reviews of recent scholarly books. I reviewed D.A. Carson’s excellent Collected Writings on Scripture (Crossway, 2010), which was compiled by Andy Naselli, and Naselli and Collin Hansen’s edited volume Four Views on the Spectrum of Evangelicalism (Zondervan, 2011). As of this summer, I’m cultivating an expertise in reviewing books in which Andy has a hand.

You can subscribe to STR through the journal’s website.

Wednesday

8

August 2012

0

COMMENTS

Andrew Fuller and His Friends

Written by , Posted in Conferences, History, Ministry, Theology

On September 21-22, 2012 the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies at Southern Seminary will be hosting its sixth annual conference. The conference theme is “Andrew Fuller and His Friends.” From the conference website:

It is not every Baptist theologian who has a movement named after him, but Andrew Fuller was so important a theologian that historians of the church actually talk about a perspective called “Fullerism.” Fuller’s views, though, were not the product of simply his own theological reflection, but were formulated by him in dialogue with a close circle of friends and subsequent joint action with these friends, especially in missionary endeavors. This year The Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies is thrilled to devote its annual conference to thinking about Fuller’s friends: their lives and ministries and how they shaped and were shaped by Fuller, whom later generations called “the elephant of Kettering”–a reference to his weighty theological influence. Come and join us this September as we spend time and energy in thinking about a past Christian thinker and his circle of friends whose influence for good and for the Kingdom of the Lord Jesus has been enormous.

I’m excited to be giving one of the plenary addresses at the conference. I’ll be speaking on “Robert Hall Sr. Andrew Fuller’s Mentor.” My address will be a adapted from my introduction to the new edition of Hall’s Help to Zion’s Travellers, which I edited for BorderStone Press in 2011. Robert Hall Sr. was the “grand old man” of the Northamptonshire Association. He is largely unknown to church history, but mentored many of the younger pastors in the association, including Fuller and William Carey. He is a role model for all pastors who are interested in investing in the younger generation.

Check out the conference website to see the full schedule and register for the conference. I hope to see some of you in Louisville in September for this conference.

Thursday

2

August 2012

0

COMMENTS

New Andrew Fuller Biography from Desiring God

Written by , Posted in Books, History, Ministry, Missions, Theology

If you read this blog much or if you’ve ever taken my Baptist History class at Southeastern Seminary, you probably know that Andrew Fuller is my all-time favorite Baptist pastor-theologian. In fact, this fall I’m teaching an elective at SEBTS on Fuller’s theology (there is still time to sign up for the course). I’ve also written some articles that touch upon Fuller’s life and times and am editing a volume in the Works of Andrew Fuller project. Needless to say, I’m a big fan.

I was delighted to learn that Desiring God has published a short e-book biography of Fuller written by John Piper. The biography, titled Andrew Fuller: I Will God Down If You Will Hold the Ropes (Desiring God, 2012) is a revision of Piper’s biographical talk on Fuller at the 2007 Desiring God Pastor’s Conference. I appreciate Desiring God offering this e-book (and several other missionary biographies) as free resources. If you’d like to learn more about Andrew Fuller’s life and thought, this short biography is a great place to start. For a lengthier study, I’d recommend Paul Brewster’s Andrew Fuller: Model Pastor-Theologian (B&H Academic, 2010) and Peter Morden’s Offering Christ to the World: Andrew Fuller 1754-1815 and the Revival of Eighteenth Particular Baptist Life (Paternoster, 2004).

(Image credit)